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The Daily times-enterprise. (Thomasville, Ga.) 1889-1925, December 15, 1889, Image 1

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VOL. 1--NO 1S4. £ m liter. TEOMASVILLE, GEORGIA. SUN AT MORNING, DECEMBER 15, 'SS!> ,S5.00 PER ANNITM IN THE CITY. Cigarettes and the Law. The new Georgia law against sell' ing or furnishing cigarettes to minors is a step in advance of anything hith erto attempted by any of the states. Whatever may he thought of the power exercised by the state to res train the'use of the cigarette by boys, it is undoubtedly true that the object of the law is good. The cigarette is the most harmful way in which the vile weed can be taken, and as a majority of the boys of the state have come to the conclusion that the use of the cigarette was a necessary ad junct to their young' manhood, their health was and is likely to suffer. If grand juries will continue to indict offenders the sale .of cigarettes in Georgia will materially fall off. Voice From tho Pa4. Col. Solomon D. Betton, of Cuth- bert, spent Friday night in our town. Col. Betton says lie left Thomasville just fifty-eight years ago, and this is his first visit since. He left it a little hamlet, with only a few log houses. He was a classmate of Jefferson Davis at West Point for two years, but re signed and was appointed a midship man in the Navy by President Mon roe, and was on the frigate Brandy wine which carried Gen. LaFayette to France on his return from a visit to the United States in 1825. Col. Betton has a remarkable memory, both of long [iast and recent events, and has retained his mental and phys ical powers strikingly. He is still about ns straight and erect as when a cadet at West Point, and his mind is stored with interesting reminiscences, which he relates in a most pleasant manner. He tells of court, held here in the olden times in a log house, and of having seen an offende? put in limbo, by order of the presidingjudge. the prisoner having been taken out by the sheriff (a Mr. Dekle) and hav ing his head thrust under the rails of a worm fence, which was the only county piison. Col. Betton stopped over to see his friend. Judge Ilansell, whom he knew in Milledgeville in “old lang sine," and promises at an early day to come and spend time enough to visit old scenes and to hunt up Borne living old friends and the dc- scendents of some who have passed away. Tho Belt Ellin Combination. Last night the Academy of Music was packed to the door on the second appearance of the Royal Marionettes. Without a doubt this is the best nov elty show of the kind that has ever visited us. Year after year this com pany has visited us, until they have become favorites of our city, and their yearly visit is looked upon as a regu lar event. The show improves every time they come, for which they receive the benefit, as they play to packed houses every night. To-night they give away two China tea sets, forty- four pieces each, two chamber sets, twelve pieces each; studio lamps and coin silver, watch besides ioo other presents, and we look for a full house to-night.—Macon News. This company will exhibit here three night and matinee, commencing next Thursday. See advertisement. South Georgia Conferenc. Second Day.—A very promising class of young men was received on trial, among them Thomas Laing, who formerly lived in Cairo. The usual minute business was tran sacted in the regular order. Bishop Hargrove inquires carefully into the work and character of the young men who are undergraduates. Bishop Hargrove is not a rtaiwtinal Bishop,but makes sufficient use of them to indicate the character of the work, which has been done by tiie preachers. He is very genial in manner, but is firm as a presiding officer and main tains as good order as is possible in a conference of Methodist preachers. The Bishop and presiding elders will soon have the appointments ready, and then the preachers will get into a feverish haste to leave. A new district has been formed, and some new man will likely be promoted to the responsible office of Presiding Elder. Last night the educational anniver- saiy was held,and telling speeches were made by Dr. Bass,president of Wesleyn Female collrge, Dr. Chandler, of Em ory College, and Dr. W. P. Harrison, of the Quarterly Review. Our col leges have a large and growing pat ronage, and their great need is an en dowment sufficient to cheapen colleg iate education. Some few of the preachers are ab sent on account of sickness; but the great bulk of them are here, and are looking well. The reports generally indicate that the year has been one rf progress and prosperity. The conference will probably ad journ on Monday morning. M. Rev. W. J. Snivcly, of Louisville, Ivy., will preach at the Methodist church this morning and this evening. He is an eloquent pulpit orator. Superior court has adjourned, and jurors,witnesses lawyers and officers of of tho court arc happy. See the new change in the adver tisement of C. H. Young & Co. They are carrying one of the choicest lines of goods ever brought to Thorn- asville. About the only time the small boy thinks of traveling for the benefit of his health, is when he is in a farmers’ apple orchard and sees the owner and a cross dog approaching. Then he travels. Health and Spirits. Whatever may be thought to the contrary, the standard of health is as liable to fluctuations as the weather. The barometer is in a measure, the gauge of the state of the weather, but we have no instrument for estimating, even with an approach to the truth, the state of the vitality of any individ ual. The customary salutation, even when replied to in the usual adverbial manner, is certainly no accurate crite rion of the state of the health, since a general paralytic often feel* much bet ter than he has any physiological right And, in opposite fashion, a man who does not know how lie feels, may be in first-rate health, or, at least, in a splendid condition for opposing those forces which are constantly tending, like the force of gravity, to bring a man to earth. Every one knows, in a greater or less degree, that which makes for his physical welfare, but it is not always realized to its iu'lest extent, that an improvement in the feeling of health is not always desirable in the interests of longevity. To feel extra ordinarily well costs much, and the excessive expenditure of mental force may derange a considerable number of coporeal functions. The desire to want to be in good “form” requires restriction in the case of many nervous individuals, whose powers are not al ways equal to their appetite for high spirits.—Lancet. Davis and Lee. “In the history of this century there are two names which, when the passions of sectional warfare will have died, will shine prominently in the galaxy of the Anglo-Saxon race— Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee.” So said Bishop Beckwith in his eloquent and profoundly affecting address upon the death of the great leader of the Confederacy. The deep rich voice of the Bishop, eloquent in pathos, tremulous with feeling, resonant witii emotion, filled the great church with the impassioned tones ot the orator. A Good Opportunity. Fond Lover—'“Is your pa in, Ad- die? - ’ Gentle Maiden—‘‘Yes; but you may come in.” “I don’t think he likes me, and he might”— “There is no need of being afraid ; he is engaged.” “Engaged, is lie ?” “Yes; he stayed out until after 12 o’clock last night and he went off this morning without giving ma a chance to talk to him. She is talk ing to him now and he won’t he in this part of the house for the next three hours. Conic light in.” What She Liked. "Well, Annie, do you like going to school ?” asked a visitor of an amiable girl who had never been famous for her devotion to her books. “Ye es,” said Annie, hesitatingly, after some consideration, “I really think I like it very well.” “That’s good. And why do you like it?” “Well, there are so many pleasant things about it,” snid Annie, with a smile over remembered joys. t‘,Walk ing to the school-house in the morn ing, you know, and talking with the girig at recess and coming home at noon and night. Oh, yes, I really think I like to go to school.” The Czar’s Ironclad Train. A new imperial train has just been built for the Emperor of Russia. '1 he saloons are covered with iron outside, and then comes eight inches of cork instead of the steel plates with which the carriages of the old train were pro tected. All the saloons (which com municate by a covered passage > arc exactly the same in outward appear ance, so that no outsider may he able to discover in which carriage the Czar is traveling. During the Empe ror's journey last autumn he passed the most of his time in a carriage, which, from the outside, looks like a luggage van. A natural gas field, which was lately discovered a few miles east of Welland, Onl., is being developed with energy by the company of which Mr. Eugene Cosle is manager. The second well, which was completed a few days ago, has been torpedoed with 40 quarts of nitro glycerine, and the result, after a careful measurement by Mr. C’oste, shows a production of over 500,000 feet of gas per day. The closed or rock pressure of the two wells now completed is 475 pounds to the square inch, which would a low the gas to be piped too miles.—Scientific American. Mrs. Deering—‘T was surprised at your condition when you came in last night. It s a long time since I saw you so before.” Mr. Deering—“Now, what’s the matter? I’ll swear I was sober last night.” “I know you were, and that’s what surprised me.” A Lesson in Spelling. I’ay great attention? What dues this spell —Chough phtheighttcau ? Well, according to the following rule it spells—it spells—Do you give it up? It spells potato, viz.-—gh stand as for p, you will find from the last letters in hiccough; digit for o, as in dough ; phtli stands for t, as phthisic ; eigh stands for a, as in neighbor ; tte stands for t, ns in gazette, and can stands for o, as ia hc.au. Tims you have p-o-t-a-t-o. Who will give another?—Ycnowine's News. We know a young lady who made last year ten hales of cotton, worked two acres in potatoes, milked three cows, did the churning, did all the washing and ironing, worked the garden, made a hundred and fifteen gallons of syrup, twenty two bushels of pens, and sold them Wednesday for 833. She sold her potatoes for 875, her cotton brought her 8451 ; she made 835 taking in sewing, mak ing in the aggregate 8021. .She did most all the work herself, and only paid out a few dollars for extra work. She is as pretty as Cleveland’s wife.— Sumter Times. If that girl does not get a good husband, she richly deserves one. Reginald—"I have a vague idea—” Grosvetior (interrupting) — “What, that is a positive improvement! Let me congratulate you.” Baby oneSolidRash Ugly, painful, blotched, mnliclonn. No rmt u.v ilar, no pence by night. Doctors nml nil rcuacdlcM fniled. Tried Cullen- m. Kffeci MnrrelloUN. Have* hi* life. Cured by Cuticura Our oldest. clilM, now six years uf acc, when an infant. ulx months old was attacked with a virulent, malignant akin disease. All ordinary remedies failin',-,we called our family physician who attempted to cure it; but it spread with ill most Incredible rapidity, until the lower por tion of the little fellow’s person, from th« mid dle of his back down to Ills knees, was one solid ash, ugly*painful, blotched and malicious, we Remedies. fleet was simply"marvellous. In three or veeks a eompleto cure was wrought, leav ing the little fellow’s person as white and healthy as thouifdi he had never been attacked. In my . . h _ ...1 _„,i i.«„ nr. lapinii valuable remedies saved his life, o-ilay lie ia a strontr, healthy child,perfect II, no repetition of the disease having Att’y at La Boy Covered "With Scabs. Mv boy, aged nine years, has been troubled all his life by a very bad humor, which appeared all over his body in small, red blotches, with a dry white scab on them. Last year he was worse than ever, being covered with scabs from tho top of bis head to his feet, and continually growing worse, although he had been treated by two phoBleians. As a last resort, I determined to try the Cuticura Remedies, and am happy to say they did all that I could wish. I sing theui according to direction, the humor rapidly dis appeared, leaving the skin fair and smooth, and performing a thorough cure. The Cuticura Remedies are all you claim lor them. They ortli their weight in gold. F/LKAViTT, No. Andover, Mass. Cuticura Resolvent. Tho new Blood Purifier and purest and best of Humor Remedies, internally, and Cuticura, the great Skin Cure, and Cuticura Soap, an exquis ite Skin Beautlllei, externally, speedily, perma nently, and economically cure in early lift* itch ing, burn lug, bleeding, scaly, crusted, pimply, (il pages, 50 illustra ..IrtSkin and Si ions, and 100 Mppr HOW MY SIDE ACHES. k and I tarin" 1’aii 7 bv the I'll- Inlirriicil Ilfoeil Poisou. How many people there are whose dis tress from sores, aches, pains ami eruptive tendencies arc due to inherited hlood poison. Had blood passes Irom pam.t to child, and it therefore is tin* duty of husband and wife to k<ep their ldood pure. This is easily accomplished by a timely use of B. B. B. (Botanic Blood Balm). Stand to the Blood j{alm Co., \ thin fa, for book ot most con vincing proof. James Hill, Atlanta, On., writes: ‘‘My two sons were afllicted with hlood poison, which doctors said was hereditary. They both broke out in sores and eruptions which B. I*. B. promptly controlled and finally Mrs. S. M. Williams. Sandy, Texas, writes: • Mv three poor afllicted children, who in herited blood poison, have improved rapidly alter a use of B. B. II It is a Godsend.” .1. K. Wilson, Glen Alpine Station, N. C\, Feb. K5, 188o, writes: “Bone and blood poison forced me to have my leg amputated, and on the stump there came a large ulcer, which grew worse every day until doctors gave me up to die. I only weighed 120 pounds when I began to take B. B, B., nnd 12 bottles increased my weight to 180 pounds and made me sound and well. I never knew what good health was before.” CASH GROCERIES, While not iu the ring yet, are iu town by a large majority, mul can point to friends nnd acquaintances in nearly every household in Thomasville. Are you one of its friends? If not, make it’s acquaintance at once, for it will save you money. It’s competitors will, sometimes,—when you stand by and make them do so—meet it’s prices, but just as soon as you quit watching them they will charge you the same old-time prices. Send and get it’s prices and compare them with your hook, and don’t fail to find out how much more it’s competitors charge for Raisins, Currants, Citron, etc, for making your fruit cake than it does. Respectfully, M. P. PICKETT. Ilucklrn’* Arnica Waive. The Best Salve in the World for Cuts Bruises, Sores, Ulcers, Salt Rheum, Fever Sores, Tetter, Chapped Hands, Chilblains Corns, nnd all Skin Kruptions, and positively cures Piles, or no pay required. It is guar anteed to give perfect satisfaction, or money refunded. Price 25 cents per box. For sale by S. J. Cassels, Drug Store. Worth Knowing. W. H. Morgan, merchant, Like City. stead i had d dia*g t dozen had u< reined as Dr, d fo 1, attended . distressing cough and running into rnption iu its first stages. He tried so-called popular cough remedies and y grew worse. Was -educed in flesh, flieultv in breathing and was unable p. Finally tried Dr. King’s New l)is- ■ for Consumption and found inline- vlief, and after using about half a bottles found himself well and has ) return of the disease. .Vo other y can show so grand a record of cures, King s New Discovery for consump- Giuranteed to do just what is claira- it. Trial bottle free at S, J. Cassels’ I.4HI.V OATS. All parties to whom l engaged the early oat for seed, are notified that 1 am ready to deliver the same The yield having proven better than I expected, 1 can also furnish a few other parties. Apply as soon as possi ble, if you would be supplied. It is the best early oat that I ever planted, and yielded more than the old reliable rust proof oat last season. J. T. CHASTAIN. Latest Designs! LARGEST STOCK! Lomst Prices! FOR- FOOTWEAR -AT— Near Post-Office. IEIJ50ANT STOCK OF FANCY .'.SLIPPERS FOR Ladies and: GENTS DESIRABLE HAS GIFT. at City Shoe Store, Near Post Office.