Digital Library of Georgia Logo
GALILEO Logo

The daily press. (Atlanta, Ga.) 1894-1???, November 02, 1894, Image 3

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page.

Ike Date ct the KDeGua. Remember that the Coogrtsak-Da! Elect!*!:* cemj oil on Tu*td.iv, No vernier 6't>, 1801. Don’t forget the day. Tall your neighbors. It y<.u - went t<» rote tor a Coegretsmaa "o to the polls Tue«>?.»y, November ‘Sih. UNIONS ANC APPRSIvncES. A Current Charon <(Uul Labor Organ!, eatloan Thoroochly Disproved. Professor Bemis has done a real serv ice to the labor orgasisatioas <,f the United States in disproving the very current charge that they diecrimiaatc >ga!ust American boys in choosing ap prentices to ths various mechanical trades, and that therefore native burn Amcrieuns ate tumble io engage in such occupations. This assertion, vvhi.-.ti has f.aitjed nide ctcdiss.ee. was made some ti.'ae ago in an article tn The Century Magazine io these words: “The American bo- has no rights which ergautjed tabor is bound to re u'peot. Be is denied instruction as an apprentice, and if he he taught his trade in a trade school be is refused adiute s‘or. to nearly id’, trade unianr. and is boycotted if be attempts >.-» work as r. taiitmicn man. The question •>! his chai actor and tkfli enters lota the mat ter only tu c’bjcrimir.a'.s ajraiast him. All tho trade unions o: the country are cc®troJied by imeigntr*, wnu uomprise a great majority of their raeiubera While they te.’nse admission to the born American boy, iacy admit ail foreign applicants with little or na regard to their training or skill” These allegations. If they could be substantiated, would be u serious thing fu lauized labor. There is no more roc.. this country for industrial or ganizations which discriminate against the native bom than fw political or gan izatious which ostracize those of for eign origin. ‘‘Know Nothingism” and *’apuisn»‘* are as dstostab'.e In business as In politics, Profeasor Bemis, how ever, has demonstrated, wo think, with out leaving room for reasonable doubt, that this very serious charge against our labor unions is without foundation. It is a pity that his article did not ap pear in one of tho popular magazines of general circulation rather than in the purely economic publication in which it was given space, and which oircir lates mainly among college professors and theoretical students of politics. It would be well for people interested in furthering tho cause of organized labor to procure the publication of a careful summary of it as widely as possible. It is impracticable in a necessarily brief article to give any just idea of the extent of the investigation which Pro fessor Bemis made before announcing his conolnsions. He, however, explains his method with sufficient explicitness to warrant confidence in the results ob tained. As to the assertion that foreign ers control our labor unions and refuse admission to the American born hoy he says: ‘‘While the foreign born are in the majority in many of the hard handed industries, this is not because of our la bor organizations, but often in spite of their efforts—of late increasing—to prevent, by restricting immigration, this form of competition of those with a lower standard of living. Where the American born are not in our unions it is either because the American boy does not like manual labor, and so is not en gaged in the trades in which there are unions, or else he refuses to join the union of his trade. An intense, self suf ficient individualism, which was more fitted to our earlier history, where or ganization of capital was also little de veloped, than m tho present era of tiie corporation and the trust, keeps a largo but of into decreasing percentage of the American boys actually in our trades from joining the unions of those trades. ” Os the other charge—namely, that the unions are hostile co tho apprenticeship system per se—Professor Bemis says: “Only 17 Os tho 48 unions had any national rules restricting apprentices, and only 14 of these unions, with 71,- 000 members, or 14 percent of tho 500,- • 000 in the 48 unions, reported any suc- cess in the enforcement of such rules. Os these 71,000, 9,500 were glass work ers, 5,417 were hitmakers, 23,000 were iron molders and 20,000 were journey men tailors, and these last Allowed one appranttoo to every journeyman, tho ap prenticeship lasting four to five years, u very literal rule. The downfall of the apprenticeship system is largely duo to the introduotiou of maoblaery and the consequent subdivision of work in large shops. This raudcrait impracticable for tho employer to take a personal interest in aac'r of his men or to give them an all itfoxid training. It is more profita ble to aet the learner at work upon a single machine or branch of work, where ho will soon acquire speed. The boy prefers this, because fas is eager to begin earning as soon us possible, but the apprenticeship system as managed under modern conditions is at best a poor method of trade iuslrcctlou. ” The disappearance of apprentices is only one of the phenomena in the pro gressive development of machine pro duction. It is a necessary result of the substitution oi purely mechanical labor . fer the skilled work of trained artificers. The boy who as an apprentice was a helper to the journeyman now becomes his competitor, and save in a very tew trafts has so brief a period of tutelage as not to be in the proper sense an ap prentice at ail. Nat? conduces govetu indcatiy today, and no is but blind who would try to solve ihe problem cf labor bow by the prircijles whw>h applied ’.<; It tiiree-qua: tors of a century ago. Yet. this is exactly what a host cf professed eeonomisw ate trying to di.—Chicago Times. I’aupcf I«abor Home. The strjk«- among too einrtmrkcrc ol New York bns brought octßtne appall ing facts. The average wsge of the women euinfcy.d in the raatcrias is tiom 43 to fi> ptr week. A git! must w four co*lais or four thick sleeves to make a a«st. Surely what Hood says i true. Y«t this shirt and cc-llar n industry Is the one above ad ct?<:s :-i srti-sh iast winter it was said that labor icoelvcd Abe '-er.afit of ’he 100 per cent ptote«ttan given t:. Out npoa i lypocii»y‘ No cr»irn ‘p»up-r” labor works so» l«ua «V! th«u. these inforiu a>ie g'.rb arf New Yorfi —Sioux Cil.” r>»t>nr.i —■ i - I-——- Send 41 tor Tun People's Paiity Pappr. if T J THE DAILY PRESS, ATLANTA, GEORGIA, FRIDAY EVENING. NOVEMBER 2. 1894. I’iv- Cents a Line. | 'E BICIVCE of Hon. 1". : •'itse-u on Camxiign IhG'.on fi r i«i cents. ( o I Get t.ic agency Write to \V. it. 10 9 Eroudway. A-’gis’a, Go. Oi i,) TO LEND at G and r per ') vLU CCll t ; louis are :nadc pro’Atth’: i.<j JeUv: purchase money no’es tony c.t. Scxt & to., 297 Eqnit lable b:. ’■.ANTED.- 1, oi location 1 and veil isip.-rwtfd. Will buy stock I »ud inpUii.cu'.r. Name y-.ur beat terms i for cash pir.-hascr. Give e.eseriytioa ■ sni tall partic.iUrs. Owner only, ad- ■ dress .7. d. V, sice, 3-i, I’-' Wasaing ’ t - .. st., Chicago, ills. ! e/GR SALE.— Interest m nice legiti i mate business in Atlanta paying . from 100 to 500 cer c> :4: e;:n 1 c sought ; very theup; from <590 io .SI.UOO re i quired. Address It O. Box 28:1. i A lAT.TOONS—I cm row prepared to ■ furnish ref.-sin papers with car | toons at very low rates.* Wm. F. lien- I Person. 8 S. Broad strcet, # Atlanta, Ga. ! ll'.'fcr-.nces: The Daily Press and I’eo- ■ pie’s party I'aper. I A GUIDf.-POST TO HEALTH-This !- i >5 to notify aU inquiriug friends that VIA VI is still only a short dis- I tanee frari them, and that it has come to stay. Anyone desiring this remedy, which is so Jar tv all othersof the kind on the maikot, cr.n get it at 608. Equit able building, Atlanta, Ga. AU appli cations for information and advice will ; receive prompt attention from the lady I in charge. Consultations with Chicago r.hysi ( cians free to VIAVI patients. ICOAL, WOOD AND LUMBER. For Gcal and Wood go to Baudall Bros., corner W hite hall and Garnett, ’phons 93G For Coal, Wood and Lumber 648 Marietta st., ’phone 376 Sold at a Bargain. Do yon want to educate your chil dren ? If so then buy from Mrs. .1. J. C. McMahan, Athens, Giu, the lot and 25-room house overlooking State Uni versity. Tuition is free at the Univer sity, and this is toe best location in Athens for a boarding house. Sold cheap, and terms made easy. Posses sion given Ist December. .’ New Crops Seeds —Crop 1894. I. Georgia raised Rye, Fulcarter "Wheat, Winter grazing Oats, the famous Crim son Clover, Pearl Onion Sets. Silver Skin Onion. Sets, Yellow Danvers Sets; also a full line’cf fresh Tiiroip Seeds and all the garden seeds suitable for fall and winter gardens. tVbol-sale and retail New Seed Store, 19 South Broad street, Atlanta, Ga. J. C. Bucher. W. C. T. U. meets on Thursday at 3:30 p. m., at 54 Orme street, at resi dence of Mrs. Tripp. wriCEi The subscription price of the Peo ple’s Party Paper will bo. after Oc tober 15th, 81.00 per year, 50 cents for six months. In clubs of five or more yearly subscribers, 75 cents. All clubbing rates, commissions, premiums and campaign offers will be withdrawn on that date. Positively no yearly subscribers taken for 75 cants except in clnbs of five or more sen*, at one time. Please do not ask it of us. Those sending 75 cents except as above stated will receive the paper only nine months. Our clubbing rates with other papers Will remain as now with a few changes. List of reform papers and clubbing list will be found on another page. Our Publishing Co., ts Atlanta, Ga Buy Stocji in Our Pnlilishing Company. This company has been duly char tered under the laws of Georgia. • The amount of its capital stock is l 825.000, in shares of $lO each. The company has bought and paid for f The People’s Party Paper and its printing >3l«eoutfit. This property is well worth $15,000. Tl.e company bought it for $5,000, and have paid for it in full. The People’s Party Paper has a circulation of 18,500. and owes no debts whatever. Those who buy sloek in the Company, of course, become part owners of The People’s Party Paper. The new Company was organized mainly for the publication of the Daily paper The Press. This has been running since July 4th last. It has met with encouragetn mt. and can be made a financial success. It already has a bona fide circulation of 4,000. Only about SIO,OOO of f c Stock in the Company has been sold. We offer the remainder at 810 per share: one-half cash and. the other half payable No vember Ist, 18. M. To each person who will send us 811.00 cash we will send a $.lO share of stock and also The Daily Press for 13 I months. Every member of the People’s Party in Georgia who can possibly raise $5.00 should do so at once and g.'t an interest in liis papers. Respectfully. Thos. E. Watson, Aug. 1", 1894. President, etc. FURNTTIJRE CUT PRICES, EASY PAYMENTS Come and see us. We can ; Please You. • j WOLCOTT & BUTLER, 124 Marietta Street. Send Two Hollars For The '-Daily - Press- Four Months. : Splendid News Service. Lead i ing issues of the day dis ! cussed by Hon. Thomas E. Watson. .Atlanta, Ga. WHE.N IX BIMIOt CALL ON UNCLE RUBE Aud have your wants xurplicd in tl.a way of Co-il end Lei resiling Summer Drinks an l the Best Brands cf C.gau . and Tobaeec. Sullivan’s Free and Easy Good en'.>u:;li fcr nnyb'dy. A’-.o a • gtxvJ stock of Ln-Sood S:i •«-. Hat* 1 aud Noiion’ 1 . Alj<» 1 rrocoriw and Csr.nen Go<«J-. r^liemonib-■ il><- »amo ami iplaw. B. W. DURH a I. L Uuimp, THE MARKETS. Corrected dully by ", H. Burge, with J. J. a J. E. Maddox, r 5 E. Aiabxma btreet, Atlanta. Ga. BAGGING AX3 TIES. R.aginY. *■ ft •• Ties, Steel FLOUR. FirwtFittent 4 ’Second Patent X 75 Extra Fancy 3 33 Fancy 3 <9 Family *2 ”5 SUGARS, Granniiu-d Pcwdered C’a Cu* Loaf « Cnlxs Ma N. «.*. Y» "Hok L’innfied .. 4VI U. Yoiinv.’ Kx. C 4 COFFEES. Roasted. Arbuckle?. ICO cases, 20 75 “ Ixjxcnugs. “ •* 20 75 Gieon, extra choice 20 Common 17Hto i'» Green Mocha 24 *• Java. 28 CORN. Yellow Mixed Whice 70 MEAT.. C R Sides, Ice Cut ed Meat io Hams lireaiifAst Bacon UUto 12 LARD. Rc.x Brand in Tee?, - • • 8% Silver Leaf ” - • « 8>» Sbfe cl Brand, “ - • • Compound, “ - - • MEAL. Plain 66 Bolted 65 RICE. Pice. Best Head n*\ Good head tt “ F« i r 5 “ Rest broken 4U “ Bioken 4 MOLASSES. Best N. O. Syrup, Good S 3 V. Syrup 25 Honor D.- ps 33 Sugar blips 22 Good N. O. 18 Genuiuc Cuba by Hhd 25 “ “ Bbl 30 to 32 Imitation “ “ 15 Common Black Molasses 12 CRACKERS. S X Sodas 5 3 X Oysters « P O Crackers W* CornhiUa 8 Lemon XXX Cream 7 :i X Ginger.‘•naps 7 Plunks « Cracknels 15 Cherry Wafers 15 Pineapple *• 15 Vanjlia “ 15 Lemon “ 15 MILKS. Peninsula Milk ♦ 5n EniHe “ 7 75 Dime Brand “ 3 75 TOBACCO 3. R J. Reynolds Level Best $1 00 R.J.R 43 Maid of Atnent 31 Str a vi erry Twist 35 Schnapps 31. Long Horn 30 SNUFFS. liOrlUard’s 1 1b jar, 20 tt> cases 45 2 oz. cans, per gross.... 8 no 1 oz. chuh. “ 4 46 2 nz. bottles “ 9 00 1 ox. Ix>r.;‘j<. per dozen 1 80 Ue f .». w. Ho .no s Snuff, 1 tt> jar 45 ooz. bottl?. per .‘ase 4 76 4 oz Prtz.e Scotch, “ 7 50 2 oz Sweet SCc r ch, per gross 8 55 loz “ “ ’* 425 1 oz. Maccoboy, “ 4 25 2oz. *’ “ ,8 00 Stewart Ralph’s— -1 oz Strong Scotch. “ 4 59 2 o£ Strong Scotch, “ 8 50 DOMESTIC CANNED GOODS. 3 1b A dozen. I 15 Culifot nia Canned Apric »ts, per d0z.... 2 0J • •• Peach »s “ .. . 220 2 Tt» LUus Beans, per d9z 1 50 2 ft String Beans, v UJ 1 lb Picnic Baked Bo4na.*per duz 1 09 3 Gilt Edge, per dozen 225 2 lb Blackberries 2 lb Blueberries. “ 9u 2 w Indian Corn, “ 150 2tbM>»oipaw. “ 85 Cahf<u nia White Clicrriea. per doz 3 00 2 lb Bud Cherries, per doz 1 40 2 lb Gooseberries. “ 00 2 lb St ra wherries •* W California ivcen Gages, per doz 2 00 2 *l> EaJune I’.-as. per doz 1 25 2 E.xttu Sifted Peas, “ J 35 2 Mafrofoot Peas, “ 125 2 1b Standard Peaches. 135 3 lb 17 3 !b Pic P. : ac!ie?. per doz 1 55 2 lb Bar;:'* “ 1 2j 3lb BiV'Jh’?, • enrs “ 1♦» California ‘ears “ 2 0) .. it Bait* jerries, 1 00 ib Succotash, “ 1 50 lb romatojs “ 75 3 T< •..‘.ttlocz, “ 135 Ga.ion Tomatoes, ** 375 ArP!U‘4«UB. 8 21 Ro Md Ch oken, 2lb ” 2 75 Roast. Turkey, ‘ u “ 2 75 Clam, ) b “ 235 Cr*ibs. 2 lb “ 3 r ,O Underwood’s W If’ Deviled Ham.pi* dux- 275 •• % lb 1 (15 LohMers. pei* doz 2 03 z It Grated Pineapple pr d »z 2 o.» 2 W Shut*-! ” ‘ 1 50 11bit d- R. Plum Pudding, “ 275 ••lb " ° ” 5 (K) Biloxi Shrimp. per doz 2 W Moc:< Tn. tie Soup “ 2 75 Ox Tail Soup. “ 2 75 Cranberry Sauce, 3 1b cans, per d0>..... 2 75 Ch K f ornia Peaches, - 2 25 2 lb Green Tv.i t‘o. “ 4 2.5 FANCY GOODS. T/nffles, cißbt.il can 8 75 *• Quarter cun 1 (K) “ Halt can 2 0i) Citron, per lb 15 Currants, bulk 5>4 Bakers’chocolate 40 ttunlrei’fl. “ 35 Baker’s coca, half ti.is 45 “ ” half lb paper <•> Evaporated Cal. Apricots il% Almond?, s’udlcd - .lardon 40 Valencia 30 Boy Lea\e.«, per ib 10 Barley, pear) 5 i rauA/ d wheat 5 French b**ar.s, case- to 13 ;’0 Clc-hi c I Curro‘.ite, 1 lb pkg 7 Carry I’d w dots Nonpa <ci* C' , pi*O'-. pci* doz 2 sf) Dunham Cpcoauut, per lb 28 Clieeie. Edam #lo obtol<> 50 ** Eccjiudort. per 35 Codf.s.r, 1 It- nricka 7 •* Shredded, per doz t-u Celery, Salt, per dnz $l,O ’ to 1 35 Ru^unCaviar, I ir perdoz ..5 00 G “ 30) Fhos Dried . Farhiu, 11b pkg 7J4 Herrings. Holuaid, *n kegs. sjr.ee. v/’lo e '•'> M«icedoip<*?. WO tins per case 18 50 Mat ai op’ - D0mcztic........... >■ ( ImiOi-ted 10 i Mu*iiruoiHM .'0 to fll ?0 ] >ojps‘hicii Mince Meat, per doz. .. io; Niidavoi’.c Flakea. Bni. . .. 2 >:> j • • “ doz cam.* .3 w ' Pur tan White Oats, J. 5 Bbl 285 I •• ** *• doz to case.. :»<»o i Sao’cfc Oatf.Lißb! 2 B'. j •• “ 3 doz. to case 3to ! Olivos— Qiiar’s, ixr doz 1(0 j Phi'.:’, ]H r «ioz $:,75 to 36» I nah’ Pints. 12; I Ol ire Oil— < »iwtr s. jxjr h z s4.2>stoO(K* i PidW, ;»°r doz . >ksu»4 0(j I Hit f Pints, per do?. *2.25 to 32» i i’l Ciu’hrcMfi. Ver cre i’a) §l9 <’•»to in p-) j Pruno'. i er *’■> ...... p Si In P.’rs • 4’/;!' i.cudoii RyiMHR. tase. .. 1 7;j < :*'tdiana.?.i‘Ci* fa . . 1-’5 1 Tn p* oca 7 | >,l)9’, per ir< 7 Uuriccc’s y* p hl salad chcs'iag. jx;<* dez 3 </> putt salad dressing. doz 475 Fiancn Sard»nc< i . with roil top keg. per cav* 1«4) tin* io -JO 05 ToIMSCOSJUCC ‘ioz. 4 f/J DeviledTnrkov i 4 *5 ; v -r doz ) »«» b< 11h.d ChlO f’ijl?, R. yr r do/. 1 < o P-itie i VbKjken ‘<u lb p»'* doz iAu i potto 1 'Ji’igey j?> p«.t doz 1 5o MISCELLANEOUS. A/io Srcw. IK-Tirrw.. .',■<» j lf< v.d Bak I. ig Powder*. *4 fa P<*r nor. . 2 *>• . 1 :» •• ~ i lc\elnnd, p*r per doz 2 h '• !?> •* 'ii)i ; GG ? 4-1.:. per doz ISi | h< « t.e/ier, "* 5 0’! Rr.r Caul tr ?♦ : r.iirrTi'ic • A idle-. - - - » ; 2f f lemon Extract, pea <V»*z »<» , *. Vanilla •* •• l *z6 j i. r ts. Lb! . • • 3fc'»t o r. bi pciwk. • • • 4tC .A. Cotvugc* Dinner Set Os this Design, Unndsoniclj' DecxAted in Cobalt Blue, Myrtle Green Goliea Brown, or Premier Dcrcir. cugiish Porcslaino. The Best Ware Pieces can be On Ear tt> Ponhppfi W • • ■ W-Eg® IB pul. nr> •- oUlli® when needed. 1 lain wnite 4.9 S WoL < v wm Will not ' —' —’ Glaze or Crack. Try a Set. Try a Set. Silver Plated Ware and Cutlery of Standard Makes at prices bolow the market. Wo have everything for the Dining Bociaaad Kitchen. CARVER & HARPER 79 Whitehall and 66 Broad Street, ATIAXTA,j_ - GEORGIA. MARIETTA, GA. John D. Cunningham,, PROPRIETOR. Will sell better Fruit Trees and Grape Vines for less money than any other first-class Nursery in the South. Everything tested and fully guaranteed. Send your list oi trees and vines wanted this season, and sec how cheap they can be bought. Will send catalogue on application. Agents wanted everywhere. GEORGIA RAILROAD SCHEDULES OFFICE GENERAL MANAGER. Commencing Oct. 14, 1891, the following schedules will l»o operated, All trains run by 90th Meridian Time. The schedules nre subject to clumge without notice to the public. READ DOWN. , READ UP. Train kightJ day 'Train ; . Train I day j night Train No. 11 expb'sl wah..'No. 27 STATIONS. (No: 28 maid. ; extb's No. 12 4 3op 11 OOp ll 50p' 7 15a' 1 Ev Angust-i Ar 8 30p’ 1 OOp 5 15a 7 48a 5 04pll 28p l 2 tip ! Belair .12 37p; 4 48a 7 15a 5 17pll 40p!12 26p! 7 45a- Grovetown 7 58pj12 2Gp: 4 36a 7 Ola 5 31p 11 52p12 37pJ.... .. - Berzelia 12 I6pl 4 21a 6 47a 5 40] I'2 ngt l’2 45p! 8 00n: Harlem Lv. 7 13].12 O'.f]> 4 16a 6 37a 5 491)12 08al2 53p! 8 Oda' Dearing 7 34p!12 02p! 4 06nJ 6 28a 6 04p 12 26a' 1 lip & “O’ l , Thomson 7 20p1.1l 46a, 3 48a 6 Jia 6 14p 12 89a. 1 23p'.'MTsena |i 1 35a ! 3 35aj 6 02a 6 22p 12 47a 130 p 8 35a! Camak 7 04p|ll 28a. 1 3 27a 5 55a 6 29;-12 55a 138 pi 8 41:i Norwood 6 57;>'11 2ln! 3 19fh 5 48a 6 44p 1 10a 154 p 8:33a; Barnett 6 41p U 06a. I! 02a; 5 34» 6 57p 1 25n' 2 07p 9 03aj Crawfordville 6.32]>:!') 54a! 2 48a| 5 22a 7 20], 1 50a! 2 31p 9 I’.’a' Union Point J JJp ;l ° 82a ' 2 21i: i 5 00a ... 3 51a’ 4 22t>'10 n3o| Covington , 4 22pj 8 45a 12 22ai...... ' 11 15).! Conyers i 4 03p| 8 22a 1200nf I 4 48u' 5 Ulp.'l 42a’ Stone Mountain I 3 37p> 7. 52a 11 21p' ......| 5 00u! 5 30]>:1l. 51: Clarkston | 3 2Sp! 7 43:i j 1 J2p - Ar Atlanta I.v ' 3 7 lo.u'JO 45p!.... .. ..! 3 27a: 2 27p 9.22a' Sparta ! ti Hp4o lOalll 23pj 4 -18)1 3 L")|) 10 Ol':! Mii'edgcville I ■> 33],T0 COajlO 12p| i 5 33h -i3p 10 ;l4n Huddock't i 5 08p 9 37:’ 9 30p| j 5 53a! 3.’)■•!. 1H 32« .tan:es 4 59:- 9 28n 9 15pl i 6 45a 4 25p 11 00ii : Ar Macon Lv 4 39). 9 Olp. 8 30p| G 55;. IJ 20a 2 30)? ‘ Siiaroi: , J 36pl 8 37» 6 02p t, j',7, 2 :is]. i.v .'ni.,u l-otoi Ar '■> 2ba‘ 6 s<lp! i 705 p 3 Ifpj Crawford ; ' 8 30a 5 03p ’ 7 22p| 3 35i? Dunlap ! 8 12uj 4 46p i 727 p 3 39p Winters ! 8 07a 4 42p I 7 J4p 3 55]>| Ar Atl.cns Lv | ’ll 30a* I Siloam I ! 1 42 ]•: Il iAr WL:t< i’lch.-s Lv ... . 120 p' Jrtjk tr»iri< i»L dtiTy. \ fi li wticf. <lo not r nmi hnndav. rtitep n;.' Um** iw- A»-a it» aj. Chgric«to .. »»<•! Arlcutv anl M •<>»», *»r ii'fi’m Sle. pin/ enr-' M’./o.i m» I I‘» • Y rt< o»a rt 27 t »n ! ua'u 'lacon 6’ m nri THOS. K. SCOTT, JOE W. WHITE. A. <J. JACKSOY, (tai. i.. Ksr.»„<.. T.MefiAg-w Age)L Geairal fr.lghi and P.« Area* 5. W KIRKLAND, < ’ >• nH. HABDWICK, Agt., Atlanta] Ga. Agt., Macon, Ga, Southern Kali way CompanH! (Western System.) ( Schedule in tflLrt September I. bUUTHDOVND. . ___ !.*»»• AtDr.t. I 7 s'um! 73” pm' 4 Arrh* Mncon 10 M *m,lo 40 ctU 7 Arrhe ’e*iin ' 4 45 pm' 4 15 t nd. Arriv- Hrv i.r'ick I A 45 pm I * 15 Arrive Jack«<»niiHe 5 40pm! A 254*4*1. Arm* Sji. •i.rah ? ,Vpr»i 7 «M im ...... KOBTOBOVSH. j j - I env* At’an’s | XOO »rn 2n ) pm’l I Arrive home. 10 4<i am 440 pm] 1 Arrive Dalton 12 tM) rr 551 tin* 3 \n 1»• Chattanooga— I |<»n 710 ptn 4 Arrive Ktu xi ille 10 oi pm in Arrive RHsto' 4 .*>» am, 2 Arrive Fo.inok* 11 45 am !'• Arm- V,".<ihlnßton 940pm|4 Arrive Baltimore It) 4b pm; 5 Arr re Philadelphia 3.50 am' 7 Arrive New York. i. 6 52 am,lo re Chat tan oom C ...j 7 Arrive Cincinnati | 7 10 »m 7 Leave ChnthiHi 0gn.T..., 1 | X2O pin| 7 Airive Memphl. I | 7 00ain| 6 "through CAR RBRVICr. K Routh hound. No. 13. eolld train Atlanta to Clone connection at Teann tor .’nekaonville and No. 11, ooJiil vestibule train Atlanta tn with Pullman aleeper# attached; also eleeper for wick. No. 17 Btopa at all atationa Atlanta to Maenn; free aervAtion chair ear. Northbound—No. !A atopa at all station, between laiita and <’haltHno%A No. 12. solid train, reatibulad, with sleeper* for Cincinnati, connecting with solid train carrying York aleepoi; also connects nt Chattanooga with s eo|« i tor Mcmphia; can tea free ehair car from to Chattanooga, No. U larrtoM Pullman sleeper for Chattanooga, for occupancy at ft n,m. t.'onnccta at Chattanooga through bleeper for Memphis and solid train attached for Cincinnati. ■■ Also connections st Chattanooga with aoild train with dining car attached, for Washington, more, rinladolphla end Now York via Shenandoah ley route. H No. 5!l. Nn. 52. No. Daily. Dally, DailjM Lv Atlanta 4 10 pm fi 45 am 6 15 B Ar Lithla Springs. Ga 4 ofl pm 7 3i> am 7 12 Ar Tallapoosa fi 30 pm 9 03 nm ft 00 Ar Anniston H (MJ pm lo 35 am Ar Birmingham 10 20 pm 13 59 n’n ........... Lv Bi*, mingham. I -0 pin Ar Winona 10 40 pm Ar Greenville 2 20 Lv Birmingham Id 25 pm Ar Memphis 7 25 am B Ar Kansas Citv 7 05 am Lvßirmingham.'...7J... "Tsb ami ..T7778 Ar Shreveport 8 15 pm J ..oB Lv BinnlngFam7777L777*.T’rsi>Yim| S'dft pm 778 Ar New Orleans, La 12 50 pin 1 A 90 am rci.LMAV tKavicc. 9 No. M, Pullman Bleeper* Atlanta to Memphis vB Birmingham and X. C. M. a B. B. R. and Atlanta ■ Shreveport via Birmingham and Q. a C. Bontg. No. 52. solid tralx Atlanta to Greenville, Mias. ■ J.M.Culf, TraOlo Manager. W- A. Tubk, (<«H. Ifcss. AB O. A. BaxacoTM,. 8. H. HAtbifioK. ® A.G.P.A.,Knoxville, Tenn. A.G.r.A..Ailanta,(la.H J. J. FaawawoiiTN. D. P. A. Western Btawn. f S W. H. Tatloe. D. P A. Eastern System, Atlanta, Ga. 9 A. A. Viiwot.Pam. Agent. C. E. BcpOKAitr.TfeW Ageß oftlce Kimball Houge corner. 4 RAILROAD TIME J Bliowlnit Arrival and D«|iart,ur«. «f Train! from Union Depot,—-City Time. Western nnd Atlautte Railroad. ♦From Nashv’ll lon a.ni »To Nashville a or, ni ♦From Marietta 8 RO am ♦To Chatt na’ 3 oi pi •From I'hatt’a 12 M> pm ‘To Marietta l> 30 p •From Na’hv’il fl 25 nm •I o Naahv'll K2O pi Southern Knllwaj-. (Wostt-rn S.vslem.l •13 from Clnoln 0 40pm »I7 to Mncon IfOp •ISfiomJne’vllle7warn *IS to Cihn.,,2<Wp •llfiom Cin’a 151 pm ‘Il to BrunK TjWii "18 from M.oonll iinm •10 to f bat-tu ~. 8 000 * 5 from Chat a4>pifi * Ito .lak’viuc'THOo ♦l4 from Hrunii 7 sooin *ll to (Tnclnat II OOp Noulheri. jtnllwny Company. •'Piedn-ionl Air I^ine." F 35 frnrn #Mlilo'tin 2b nni •Il To Tiriimoiid ... 3 00 * ItfrumTncrni 8 S'* «in »3, to W„litnglon..lJoo 11 37 fi '*n, W,«l>ln,’tn 3 US ptr. IS io Tocoo. 4 3.', p •11 Ira Richmond 9 SO pm *34 to Wa.hlncton., » 00 n Following Train Bun. only 1 VoUewinaTrain Hun. onl Xl6 Irvin To-ro. 10 06 am ;l« lo Toccoa ... »» I Georgia Faciflc Ritilway. •55 fion. TnllApnoss'R 39 amPM to GrernvillaTT'fl 49 « •51 from B’lin'h.tmll 4(1 sm *SO tn Birmingham 4 10 ]i •AS hnm Glen ville. 850 pm 1*64 to Tiillirpoosa 615 p hrnhnaril Alf ljn.'. ««>., from Waal','loir 4lio pn>j«.W ioYhailTßHUr sr iTi •II from rhailr.lon *11.5 pm I*lo2 In Wa.hh|glonUoo n •4.3 from Elberton.., s 40 atni # SB to Elborton j,... 430 p A aan tiCan ii Flit rl<in Ra i I way. Lotiveit Mitchell Street Depot. •From’Fr i t Vslley.iO 00 »• nX*To~Fort Va11ey.7.773 16 pi All trains lesve the old K._Tm V. 4 G, passenger depot •Daily. ißundejr only. All other traine dally e ®ept Sunday All train* rua by stMidVd Central lim erofto M -ridlan. S, AL. NSZAHOIItO AIU-lal.lß, Tn an ! from Union pep<n- S»liort line to Norfolk anA 01.1 Point, Vn.. nnd Colnmbln. 8. C. Naw line toCbarlea* ton, b. C. Schedule In offiMt June 24, IF.2L "THE .VILANTA TRAIN~-No ext I* fare charged- * ' "woaritßOUWD. ’ «————• Eashwn TiineeM- ——— —• No. 38. No. 402. cept Atltutx No. 403 No. 41. Daily. Dally. Daily. DaUy. 715 12 00 m Lv.,..Atlanta....Ar 400 pn> C pm |U. Depot city time |(» on nm 1 A0 pin Ar. 7ziwreneev.Lv 4 GA pm .0 24 pm in 01 nm 2 28 pm|Ar . Winder...Lr 3 42 pm *A W) pin lo 45 am 3 ('3 pm 1.v.. Athens....Ar 303 ugi ppd j>m II 43 nni 4 ill pni'Ar... El|)ynnh...Ls 2 *•♦ pm '<TO pm 12 40 pm 505 pm Ar. .Abb«vitie...Lv|if 43i.:n 302 pm 1 111 pm 5 23 pmi Ar.Grnenwoo.i..Lv| 1 13 Airi ; 3 31 pm 2 15 pm (I os pni'Ar. . .Clinton. .Lv 11 53 am 1 4.1 pm ff» ll* pn*»| 7 23 iinjAi." .tdieatmLT.Arno W 3wJff’i'MS’alu io in pin| R 45 hm|Ar... Mr-uroe ...I.vJ 0 23 am f 5 ()■> »m —.J 299 nrn|Ai'-H»nderson M Lv| 244 sin ... M .,......| 403 am Ar ’.Vslrfon„J < s; 4Of pm MraraM.-...! 6 oo pm Ar..|’i«»ertbttrg. Lv ,12 55 ptn 0 41 nm Ar~Richmeii I ..Lvji2 23am ............. 112 no m Ar. Rmtimme. L'.-; 731 pm 2 20 pm Ai rjilladalp’ig Lvi 4 41 pm 1 4 5J pin A* .‘.’ew Yu- 20 am ..... - 8 30 nm Ar. < Im 6ti0,..f.v 5 00 avi 2 25 pm i.v..cj i7i77Y77\r"*7...7777Ci 3*7pm 7 69 pm Ar.. Newbagry . !»v 12 43 pm 8 U f»rn Ar-Piofcpcrity., I.r 12 29 pm 4 15 pm Ar...f'n|ttmMa.. Lv 11 15 am A 35 pm Ar.....Mimte< . .Lv 9 53 >*n, fi 45 pm Ai..<;ii'in —lion, l.v 7 15 am i." ] -ni i.\r. DarDng ■ >. : l, So ~'t | w* J iJnj >. a< ; 1 f • ,* iFI 9lo nm Ar... Nmfoik ...Lvi 2» pm* ............;1 Jth nm.AtJ'lnladeipiihL 1 1 441 pm 1 ... . I I 23 pm Ar,.New Y*»rk,.L . 12 10 pm I ............. 5 5.* pn. J 10 vral ... M ........ 5 lo fih'A: l'ii'livdelp|il*L'. II 16 pm-.... 'Ne.’3ii7 " N 07437 D»d)y. Dally 4 3> pm Lv AHnntn -city time Ar A 4j am 7 if Ar..J.a-.vi(ju.; u ill©- aastGju IJme-Lv 8 14 am 7AO pn. Ar 8 3 » pm Ar Ali.ru.a— '• 7,v f. 40 anj 9 <0 a pm' Ar......... Eltierion— *’ I/*' 5 4't »tn Xxeept H’ligUy, (l»i vi»t B ■, fi|) Vu New York, Fhilade'puis anl Iloilo,k 11. )£. (W) Norfolk and WX'ihn.oy,!, Hccnmbou. Lti. rraiDvN.M, 4K! Ai>4 403 Aoild veaUhu'ed timr.M wit': I'uUcurtir Bi.fMt sleeping c.'na freiwucii Atlanta and Wash- and I'uHimui BitjVei parlm cars betnrden Washing, tor; Hl <1 New York; b’c -pin-,' rdr ILirrile 1 . am: Washing, imi. Tialiia ,’»o. 341 o'J 41 1 in solid h.rtwC'Ui Atlanta r»n 1 t, .> r.mnia, 8. C.. wiUi€!;r*/ ;g.» caOch to Cha''car »», d. '*. 'licket. ”.ni.>.s depot or at cmnpttijy s ticket ourx*. No. w Kimhell Im>um, Y J Asdkmo ,'LP.A. JOHN h' WK.DEK.Gen.M'g r, 2L X>. Bisariff. 0. F. A..G .Qm .au Hcumv w. L. O Dvrac, Dir. fuM. Agf., Atlanta. Ofc T i I 17 f NATIONAL Is ahtrai/lit, mid ile-in-tlv-roa<l Popu list paoer, pub’i.hed at the iiATIoXAf, Cal’itol, '■ It is:. haniUops ly printed. .IH-paSfe weekly, filled witli solid facts and ia forinat on. It is literally and trrly a WATCH MA TNT f r the p.-op'e, and th- trust- l.s faitli fully periornied i>y its able and v>x,r hint editor. ,’,|r. ?. I full Il'.lHf. Every Populist shou'd sn'he.'ribe for it, and keep himsrl. fully posted on national affairs Send one dollar for u year’s subscrip tion to the NATIONAL WATCHMAN Co. Washington, l>. C. Tri.'-.'s Here can be grown anywhere else in America on the same lands, the great staple crops of the world — COTTON, CORN, WHEAT, OAT£>, BARLEY. RYE, Together with all the fruits and vege tables of the latitude. LIVE STOCK. CATTLE, HORSES, HOGS, SHEEP, Are almost a spontaneous growth of the foil. MARKET FACILITIES Arc as good as those ot any section of the South or West. We can supply all demands for land# at LOWEST PRICES and on EASY TERMS. FREE or Greatly Reduced transportation furnished on application to all bona fide land seekers On all Railroads running into or out I of Fort Worth, the Great Railroad cen tre of North Texas 'Correspondence Solicited. Leonard & Calhoun, Real Estate, Sale and Ex change Agents, No. 113 Houston Street, West Side Court House Square, Fort Worth, Texas. The Georgia Kidland & Gulf Railroad. A Qu c'<. Safe and Comfortable Route. The only route to Warm Springsand Oak Mountain. Georgia. rt< IIE!>L l.tl IS F.ITKCT SEPTK’n'.BR Ifi, 1894. .%• >it i ti hod Nd.' I Mo, 51 ] No’ M. I f Aii.r. I paht. I.v. ColurnbUH - JTien. m. j »:>op, m. I. v. m orb, (hill - - tewia m > 1:04 pm. I.v link noucitahi - -jh;iOa. m. i:l6p. m. I.v Waim Minings - - , t>;l”a.m. 4:spp.m I.v v ocdlmrv - - . IKOOs. pi. I fcizp m. I,v Conc'-rd - - - 0:25 a. m. 5:41 p. m. I.v » llilhiimoh - - IkO a. m. | 6:(B p. m. l.v Giilfin ; It 1 : On. in. I 6:20 p. m. .V M < o’i. <' Il It - - I T-iionm 10:23pm_ Ar Ai Il H J;::wum | H:O6pm. . LvGrifll’i - • | I 6:98 pm. Ar.McDonough ■■ - iJL 2i. lu k •>. | HOUTII notNb I No. 62 I Ho.to~ I lIAII.V I PAII.Y I.vMc ouough | tkisani I * . A r O r I ffl n_ Lt V JAfi-l I.v Macon, C It KI _4:ir> a in I tv Atlanta. Cll It - I 7:30 ami I.v Gr.flin*- '- 111:06am < t'ipn I.v Williamson - - 1 !l-23uin I C:t2pm tv < > coni - 9:46am 7:11 p m I.v Woodbury • - - 10:16am 7:3opm j.v W'urm springs - - io nr. am 7;ftopm i.v O. k uounhiiii I 11:l<<am 5:29 p m i.v Wnie.-ly uali 11:20 am *BO pnt Ai Columbus I 19:14am I 0;l0pm All trains arrive and depart the I nion Depots nt Columbna and Griffin. AM; for tickets and see that they read via Lie GEORGIA MIDLAND A GULF RAILROAD Ci.tr rox Joses, C. W. < UKsns. Gen. I‘naa. Agent. General Manager, Columbus, Ua.