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The Western Georgian. (Rome, Floyd County, Georgia) 1838-18??

 

Title:

The Western Georgian.

Place of Publication:

Rome, Floyd County, Georgia

Geographic coverage:

  • Rome, Floyd county

Publisher:

None

Dates of publication:

1838-18??

Description:

  • Began with: Vol. 1, no. 1 (January 19, 1838).

Frequency:

Weekly

Languages:

  • English

Subjects:

  • Georgia--Newspapers.
  • Georgia.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204622

Notes:

  • Description based on: Reproduction of original print version of vol. 1, no. 1 (January 19, 1838); title from masthead.
  • Latest issue consulted: Reproduction of original print version of vol. 1, no. 42 (November, 6, 1838).
  • Microfilm.

LCCN:

2019233510

OCLC:

1120940074

The Western Georgian. January 19, 1838

About

Using a hand press in their offices at 602 East First Street, Rome, Georgia, Samuel S. Jack and James A. Wright published the inaugural issue of Rome’s first newspaper, the Western Georgian, on January 19, 1838. The Georgian’s political allegiance was firmly established in Wright’s opening editorial when he wrote, ‘suffice it to say, that the principles and doctrines of the Union Party will receive our support, and any public act, let it proceed from whence it may, inconsistent with these principles, will receive our reprobation.’ The Georgian’s offices in Rome put it closest to ongoing Cherokee removal efforts. Major Ridge and John Ross, both prominent Cherokee Chiefs, had residences in Rome, and their activities were regularly reported in the Georgian’s pages. The Georgian’s Cherokee reports were widely circulated around the state’s largest newspapers, including Milledgeville’s Federal Union and Southern Recorder, Augusta’s Georgia Constitutionalist, and Savannah’s Daily Georgian. When federal troops, led by Major General Scott, arrived in Cherokee County in May 1835, it was the Georgian’s account of those events that papers reprinted across the state. Despite its important role as a Georgia frontier newspaper, the Western Georgian had a short run, and it ceased operations by 1841.