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Southern school news. (Nashville, Tenn.) 1954-1965

 

Title:

Southern school news.

Place of Publication:

Nashville, Tenn.

Geographic coverage:

  • Nashville, Davidson county

Publisher:

[Southern Education Reporting Service]

Dates of publication:

1954-1965

Description:

  • Began with: Vol. 1 (Sept. 1954); ceased with 11, no. 12 (June 1965).

Frequency:

Monthly

Languages:

  • English

Subjects:

  • Davidson County (Tenn.)--Newspapers.
  • Education--Southern States--Periodicals.
  • Nashville (Tenn.)--Newspapers.
  • Tennesee--Nashville.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204195

Notes:

  • Also available on microfilm from Library of Congress Preservation Microfilming Program.
  • Official publication of the Southern Education Reporting Service.

LCCN:

sn59049440

OCLC:

9910295820602931

Southern school news. September 3, 1954

About

The Southern School News was established by southern editors and educators following the U.S. Supreme Court opinion of May 17, 1954 declaring segregation in schools unconstitutional. The publication was organized under the Southern Education Reporting Service (SERS), directed by a board, and based out of Nashville, Tennessee. The monthly paper was intended as an informational supplement to currently publishing newspapers and covered the 17 states and Washington D.C. where segregation was required by law. The stated goal for this publication was to report the effects of this landmark decision from a factual and non-partisan perspective. The SERS reporters were to cover developments without editorial comment. Each respective state had a dedicated page recording various events related to desegregation. The Southern School News’ final issue was published in June, 1965. Citing the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the SERS board felt this event marked the end of a major transitionary period. The SERS, however, transitioned to covering, more broadly, the education of the culturally disadvantaged in the South. This shift was aided by funding from the Ford Foundation and, while the Southern School News no longer existed, the SERS’ reporting mission lived on through a newly founded magazine.