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Southern recorder. (Milledgeville, Ga.) 1820-1872

 

Title:

Southern recorder.

Place of Publication:

Milledgeville, Ga.

Geographic coverage:

  • Milledgeville, Baldwin county

Publisher:

Grantland & Orme

Dates of publication:

1820-1872

Description:

  • Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 15, 1820)-v. 53, no. 29 (July 30, 1872).

Frequency:

Weekly

Languages:

  • English

Subjects:

  • Baldwin County (Ga.)--Newspapers.
  • Georgia--Baldwin County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01212301
  • Georgia--Milledgeville.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01226246
  • Milledgeville (Ga.)--Newspapers.

Notes:

  • Also issued on microfilm by the University of Georgia Libraries.
  • Daily ed.: Daily southern recorder, 1859-<1860>.
  • Democratic. Cf. Rowell, 1871.
  • Publication suspended during occupation of city by Union troops, Nov. 22-Dec. 13, 1864.
  • Published semiweekly during the convention to secede from the Union, Jan. 15-29, 1861.
  • Publishers: S. Grantland & R.M. Orme, <1821>; R.M. Orme & Son, <1822>; Grantland & Orme, <1826-1828>; Grieve & Orme, <1834-1852>; R.M. Orme & Son, <1863-1865>.

LCCN:

sn82016415

OCLC:

9315258

Southern recorder. February 15, 1820

About

Seaton Grantland and Richard Orme, both of whom had previously worked on the Georgia Journal, began printing the Southern Recorder in February of 1820. The paper leaned politically toward the state's rights doctrine and became an extremely successful publication in the state capital. The Southern Recorder supported the Troup Faction and Whig Party throughout the antebellum period. The publication's principal rival was Tomlinson Fort's Federal Union with competition fierce enough to reach physical confrontation between editors. By the late 1850s, despite its strong state's rights orientation, the Southern Recorder published articles suggesting that compromise was possible and preferable. Once Georgia and the rest of the South seceded, however, Milledgeville's papers aligned themselves firmly behind the Confederacy. The Southern Recorder and Federal Union remained rivals until 1872 when Recorder owner, A. J. Orme sold the paper to the Federal Union; this sale resulted in the papers merging to create Union and Recorder.