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The true citizen. (Waynesboro, Ga.) 1882-current

 

Title:

The true citizen.

Place of Publication:

Waynesboro, Ga.

Geographic coverage:

  • Waynesboro, Burke county

Publisher:

Sullivan Bros.

Dates of publication:

1882-current

Description:

  • Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 28, 1882)-

Frequency:

Weekly

Languages:

  • English

Subjects:

  • Burke County (Ga.)--Newspapers.
  • Georgia--Burke County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01214162
  • Georgia--Waynesboro.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01217964
  • Waynesboro (Ga.)--Newspapers.

Notes:

  • Also on microfilm: Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Libraries.
  • Called general edition: Dec. 12, 1984-Jan 29, 1987.
  • Published concurrently with: True citizen (Waynesboro, Ga. : Local edition), Dec. 10, 1984-July 1985, and: True citizen (Waynesboro, Ga. : Early Bird edition), July 30, 1985-June 17, 1986.

LCCN:

sn89053289

OCLC:

19530958

The true citizen. April 28, 1882

About

The inaugural issue of the Waynesboro True Citizen was published by the Sullivan Brothers company on April 28, 1882. The newspaper circulated every Friday at a subscription cost of two dollars, and listed itself as an independent newspaper. In the paper’s first issue, managing editor W. D. Sullivan established the sheet held no allegiance to a political party, but the True Citizen’s political endorsements were usually for members of the Democratic Party. Editor Sullivan wrote against Democrats like Dr. William H. Felton and Emory Speer, frequently described as independent or reform Democrats, and the True Citizen supported Alexander H. Stephens for governor. In the presidential elections of 1884, 1888, and 1892, the True Citizen endorsed Democrat Grover Cleveland for president and was an anti-populist paper in the politically divisive 1890s. The True Citizen remained a family-owned newspaper well into the 20th century, with W. D. Sullivan, W. G. Sullivan, S. L. Sullivan, E. A. Sullivan, and H. Perry Sullivan all serving as the paper’s editor-in-chief. In 1913, the True Citizen still used a hand-cranked printing press, which was operated by Horace Williams, a blind African American. By 1951, the paper was owned and edited by Roy F. Chalker, Sr. whose publishing company continues to circulate the True Citizen today as Burke County’s legal organ.